Buy Buy Bank Balance – books out on 3 September 2020 – Non-Fiction

So 3 September 2020 is set to be a bookish explosion. Over 600 books are to be published on the first Thursday in September, many pushed back from previous publication dates because of a pesky invisible virus that has brought the world to its knees. Demand for books has never been so high as people fall back on books to bring comfort in an uncertain time, or find for the first time the wonder they can bring.

Of those 600, about 250 (give or take) are commercial fiction or non fiction, by that I mean non text books, manuals or other guides to life and work.  So I thought it might be an idea to show case as many of them as I can in one post, though that will certainly not include all of them. I’ve tried to include a variety of books and topics, not necessarily just the books I personally would read. Call it a shopping list if you will (because I am).

Your local independent bookshop will be primed and ready to go, so grab a pen and paper and get read to make a must read list. Yesterday was the fiction lit list, in two parts. Today we are looking at what non-fiction  and cook books come out on Thursday.

(I’ll be honest, I ran out of time so I’ve not included a synopsis and cover image for each of them – my apologies.)

Dear Life: A Doctor’s Story of Love, Loss and Consolation by Rachel Clarke, published by Abacus.

As a specialist in palliative medicine, Dr Rachel Clarke chooses to inhabit a place many people would find too tragic to contemplate. Every day she tries to bring care and comfort to those reaching the end of their lives and to help make dying more bearable.

Rachel’s training was put to the test in 2017 when her beloved GP father was diagnosed with terminal cancer. She learned that nothing – even the best palliative care – can sugar-coat the pain of losing someone you love.

And yet, she argues, in a hospice there is more of what matters in life – more love, more strength, more kindness, more joy, more tenderness, more grace, more compassion – than you could ever imagine. For if there is a difference between people who know they are dying and the rest of us, it is simply this: that the terminally ill know their time is running out, while we live as though we have all the time in the world.

House of Music: Raising the Kanneh-Masons by Kadiatu Kanneh-Mason, published by Oneworld Publications.

Permanent Record by Edward Snowden, published by Pan.

The Wicked Baker: Cakes and Treats to Die For by Helena Garcia.

Homesick: Why I Live in a Shed by Catrina Davies, published by Riverrun.

Aged thirty-one, Catrina Davies was renting a box-room in a house in Bristol, which she shared with four other adults and a child. Working several jobs and never knowing if she could make the rent, she felt like she was breaking apart.

Homesick for the landscape of her childhood, in the far west of Cornwall, Catrina decides to give up the box-room and face her demons. As a child, she saw her family and their security torn apart; now, she resolves to make a tiny, dilapidated shed a home of her own.

With the freedom to write, surf and make music, Catrina rebuilds the shed and, piece by piece, her own sense of self. On the border of civilisation and wilderness, between the woods and the sea, she discovers the true value of home, while trying to find her place in a fragile natural world.

This is the story of a personal housing crisis and a country-wide one, grappling with class, economics, mental health and nature. It shows how housing can trap us or set us free, and what it means to feel at home.

Max the Miracle Dog: The Heart-warming Tale of a Life-saving Friendship by Kerry Irving, published by Harper Element.

The Bookseller’s Tale by Martin Latham, published by Particular Books.

Russian Roulette: The Life and Times of Graham Greene by Richard Greene, published by Little, Brown.

Perfect Sound Whatever by James Acaster, published by Headline.

Simply the Best by David Lloyd, published by Simon & Schuster.

The Witness by Nicola Tallant, published by Mirror Books.

Joey O’Callaghan was just 18 years old when he became a ghost – the youngest ever person to be signed up to the Witness Protection Programme.

Groomed into a drug gang from the age of 10, a cold-blooded assassination sickened him to his core, and he broke the golden bond of gangland silence. His evidence won murder convictions against two of the most violent drug bosses in Ireland.

Relocated to England with a new identity, Joey had to face the world alone, and soon realised it was he who had received the life sentence.

15 years on, the ripple effects of the gunshots that rang out that night continue to leave a devastating legacy for everyone. None more so than Joey ‘The Lips’.

This is his story.

The Anarchy: The Relentless Rise of the East India Company by William Dalrymple, published by Bloomsbury.

Fattily Ever After: A Fat Black Girl’s Guide to Living Life Unapologetically  by Stephanie Yeboah, published by Hardie Grant.

Sicily 43′: The First Assault on the Fortress Europe by James Holland, published by Transworld.

This is the story of the biggest seaborne landing in history.

Codenamed Operation HUSKY, the Allied assault on Sicily on 10 July 1943 remains the largest amphibious invasion ever mounted in world history, landing more men in a single day than at any other time. That day, over 160,000 British, American and Canadian troops were dropped from the sky or came ashore, more than on D-Day just under a year later. It was also preceded by an air campaign that marked a new direction and dominance of the skies by Allies.

The subsequent thirty-eight-day Battle for Sicily was one of the most dramatic of the entire Second World War, involving daring raids by special forces, deals with the Mafia, attacks across mosquito-infested plains and perilous assaults up almost sheer faces of rock and scree.

It was a brutal campaign – the violence was extreme, the heat unbearable, the stench of rotting corpses intense and all-pervasive, the problems of malaria, dysentery and other diseases a constant plague. And all while trying to fight a way across an island of limited infrastructure and unforgiving landscape, and against a German foe who would not give up.

It also signalled the beginning of the end of the War in the West. From here on, Italy ceased to participate in the war, the noose began to close around the neck of Nazi Germany, and the coalition between the United States and Britain came of age. Most crucially, it would be a critical learning exercise before Operation OVERLORD, the Allied invasion of Normandy, in June 1944.

Based on his own battlefield studies in Sicily and on much new research over the past thirty years, James Holland’s SICILY ’43 offers a vital new perspective on a major turning point in World War II. It is a timely, powerful and dramatic account by a master military historian and will fill a major gap in the narrative history of the Second World War.

The Hurt by Dylan Hartley, published by Viking.

Rugby hurts. It demands mental resilience and resistance to pain. It explores character, beyond a capacity to endure punishment.

Dylan Hartley, one of England’s most successful captains, tells a story of hard men and harsh truths. From the sixteen-year-old Kiwi who travelled alone to England, to the winner of ninety-seven international caps, he describes with brutal clarity the sport’s increasing demand on players and the toll it takes on their mental health, as well as the untimely injury that shattered his dreams of leading England in the 2019 World Cup.

The Hurt is rugby in the raw, a unique insight into the price of sporting obsession.

Finding Joy by Gary Andrews, published by John Murray.

When his wife, Joy, died very suddenly, a daily drawing became the way Gary Andrews dealt with his grief.

From learning how to juggle his kids’ playdates and single-handedly organising Christmas, to getting used to the empty side of the bed, Gary’s honest and often hilarious illustrations have touched the hearts of thousands on social media.

Things They Don’t Want You to Know by Ben Brooks, published by Quercus.

Written from a teenager’s perspective, this is a unique field guide for parents about the secret lives of 21st century adolescents – from mental health to self-harm, from drugs to sexting – and how you can help them and yourself through these turbulent years without losing their trust.

Things They Don’t Want You To Know is a look at modern life through the eyes of a teenager, by someone who recently graduated from that club. Along the way, Brooks takes readers on a tour of the websites that most parenting manuals would rather pretend don’t exist. Yet this is the stuff your kids are all over, on a daily basis. There is porn, there are hallucinogens, there is cyberbullying and suicidal ideation. Brooks’ point is that to remain completely unaware of their existence can mean that as a parent, you end up getting blindsided. And being blindsided means you won’t know what to say and how to say it when things go wrong.

You’ll be surprised, shocked but you’ll also be reassured. This book will help you to understand and support your kids. They won’t thank you, but they might hate you less.

Bringing Up Race: How to Raise a Kind Child in a Prejudiced World, published by Yellow Kite.

Ottolenghi Flavour by Yottam Ottolenghi and Ixta Belfrage, published by Ebury.

In this stunning new cookbook Yotam and co-writer Ixta Belfrage break down the three factors that create flavour and offer innovative vegetable dishes that deliver brand-new ingredient combinations to excite and inspire.

Ottolenghi FLAVOUR combines simple recipes for weeknights, low-effort high-impact dishes, and standout meals for the relaxed cook. Packed with signature colourful photography, FLAVOUR not only inspires us with what to cook, but how flavour is dialled up and why it works.

The book is broken down into three parts, which reveal how to tap into the potential of ordinary vegetables to create extraordinary food:

Process explains cooking methods that elevate veg to great heights;
Pairing identifies four basic pairings that are fundamental to great flavour;
Produce offers impactful vegetables that do the work for you.

With surefire hits, such as Aubergine Dumplings alla Parmigiana, Hasselback Beetroot with Lime Leaf Butter, Miso Butter Onions, Spicy Mushroom Lasagne and Romano Pepper Schnitzels, plus mouthwatering photographs of nearly every one of the more than 100 recipes, Ottolenghi FLAVOUR is the impactful, next-level approach to vegetable cooking that Ottolenghi fans and vegetable lovers everywhere have been craving.

Pinch of Nom Food Planner: Every Day Light by Kate Allinson, Kay Featherstone and Laura Davis, published by Bluebird.

Once Upon a Tyne by Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, published by Sphere.

Ant: As the old Chinese proverb says, ‘Good things come in pairs’.
Dec: And as another Chinese proverb says, ‘If you’ve been in a double act with your best mate for thirty years, why not write a book about all your most memorable moments in three decades of showbusiness?’
Ant: Less catchy that one, isn’t it?
Dec: But no less true. And after three decades together, we’re writing that book. Covering everything from a pirate radio storyline in Byker Grove through to the biggest shows on telly, this is our story.
Ant: Thirty years, eh? Amazing.
Dec: Absolutely. Especially when you consider we are both still 27 years old.

Ant and Dec hold a special place in the hearts of TV viewers everywhere. This is their epic story, with never-before-seen photography and the very best tales from their 30 years in TV.

From their modest beginnings in Byker Grove through to their “unique” time as pop stars and an award-laden TV career, those three decades have flown by in the blink of an eye. They’ve also featured an incredible cast of supporting characters, including their first scriptwriter (an unknown comedian called David Walliams), Saturday night fun and games with countless Hollywood A-listers, and celebrities they torture – sorry, work with – every year in the jungle. Told through the lens of every TV show they’ve made, as well as everything they’ve learnt along the way, this is the riotously funny journey of two ordinary lads from Newcastle who went on to achieve extraordinary things.

Nadiya Bakes by Nadiya Hussain, published by Michael Joseph.

More Than A Woman by Caitlin Moran, published by Ebury.

Bad Blood by Lorna Sage, published by Harper Collins.

From a childhood of gothic proportions, through teenage pregnancy in the 1960s, Lorna Sage vividly and wittily brings to life a vanished time and place and illuminates the lives of three generations of women in one of the most critically acclaimed memoirs of all time.

Lorna Sage’s outstanding memoir of childhood and adolescence brings to life her eccentric family and bizarre upbringing in rural Wales.

The period is evoked through a wickedly funny and deeply intelligent account: from the 1940s, dominated for Lorna by her dissolute but charismatic vicar grandfather; through the 1950s, where the invention of fish fingers revolutionised the lives of housewives like Lorna’s mother; to the brink of the 1960s, where Lorna’s pregnancy at 16 outraged those around her, an event her grandmother blamed on the fiendish invention of sex.

Bad Blood vividly and wittily explores a vanished time and place, and illuminates the lives of three generations of women

Fake Law: The Truth About Justice in an Age of Lies by the Secret Barrister, published by Picador.

Speedy MOB: 12 minute meals for 4 people by Ben Lebus, published by Pavilion Books.

The Gift: 12 Lessons to Save Your Life by Edith Eger, published by Rider.

The Wild Silence by Raynor Winn, published by Michael Joseph.

Nature holds the answers for Raynor and her husband Moth.

After walking 630 miles homeless along The Salt Path, the windswept and wild English coastline now feels like their home.

And despite Moth’s terminal diagnosis, against all medical odds, he seems revitalized in nature – outside, they discover that anything is possible.

Now, life beyond The Salt Path awaits. As they return to four walls, the sense of home is illusive and returning to normality is proving difficult – until an incredible gesture by someone who reads their story changes everything:

A chance to breathe life back into a beautiful but neglected farmhouse nestled deep in the Cornish hills; rewilding the land and returning nature to its hedgerows becomes their new path.

Along the way, Raynor and Moth learn more about the land that envelopes them, find friends both new and old, and, of course, embark on another windswept adventure when the opportunity arises.

The Wild Silence is a story of hope triumphing over despair, of lifelong love prevailing over everything.

It is a luminous account of the human spirit’s instinctive connection to nature, and how vital it is for us all.

Entangled Life: How Make Our Worlds, Change Our Minds and Shape Our Futures by Merlin Sheldrake, published by Bodley Head.

English Pastoral: An Inheritance by James Rebanks, published by Allan Lane.

Back to School by Jack Sheffield, published by Bantam Press.

The year is 1969 and Jack Sheffield is a young teacher in need of a job. In a room full of twenty-nine other newly qualified teachers, he’s overjoyed when he’s appointed to Heather View Primary. Jack is excited to start his first year there and to begin shaping young minds in a beautiful new location on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales.

But Heather View isn’t as idyllic as it first sounds. In fact, it looks more like a prison than a primary school. With less than adequate funding and a head teacher who doesn’t seem to care, it’s no easy task to give the kids the education they deserve. But Jack’s determined to do just that.

Full of warmth and good humour, Back to School is like taking a nostalgic walk through the past to a simpler time.

The Madness of Crowds: Gender, Race and Identity by Douglas Murray, published by Bloomsbury.

Written in Bone: Hidden Stories in What We Leave Behind by Professor Sue Black, published by Doubleday.

Drawing upon her years of research and a wealth of remarkable experience, the world-renowned forensic anthropologist Professor Dame Sue Black takes us on a journey of revelation. From skull to feet, via the face, spine, chest, arms, hands, pelvis and legs, she shows that each part of us has a tale to tell. What we eat, where we go, everything we do leaves a trace, a message that waits patiently for months, years, sometimes centuries, until a forensic anthropologist is called upon to decipher it.
Some of this information is easily understood, some holds its secrets tight and needs scientific cajoling to be released. But by carefully piecing together the evidence, the facts of a life can be rebuilt.

Limb by limb, case by case – some criminal, some historical, some unaccountably bizarre – Sue Black reconstructs with intimate sensitivity and compassion the hidden stories in what we leave behind.

Cook Slow: Light and Healthy by Dean Edwards, published by Hamlyn.

Dead Doubles: The Extraordinary Worldwide Hunt for One of the Cold War’s Most Notorious Spy Rings by Trevor Barnes, published by  Orion.

THE PORTLAND SPY RING was one of the most infamous espionage cases from the Cold War. People the world over were shocked when its exposure revealed the shadowy world of deep cover KGB ‘illegals’ – spies operating under false identities stolen from the dead.

The CIA’s revelation to MI5 in 1960 that a KGB agent was stealing crucial secrets from the world-leading submarine research base at Portland in Dorset looked initially like a dangerous but contained lapse of security by a British man and his mistress. But the couple were tailed by MI5 ‘watchers’ to a covert meeting with a Canadian businessman, Gordon Lonsdale. The unsuspecting Lonsdale in turn led MI5’s spycatchers to an innocent-looking couple in suburban Ruislip called the Krogers.

But within weeks the CIA rang the alarm – their critical source of intelligence was to defect within hours – and MI5 was forced to act immediately. The Krogers were exposed as two of the most important Russian ‘illegals’ ever, whom the Americans had been hunting for years. And Lonsdale was no Canadian, but a senior KGB controller.

This astonishing but true story of MI5’s spyhunt is straight from the world of John le Carré and is told here for the first time using hitherto secret MI5 and FBI files, private family archives and original interviews. Its tentacles stretch around the world – from America, to the USSR, Canada, New Zealand, Europe and the UK. DEAD DOUBLES is a gripping episode of Cold War history, and a case that fully justified the West’s paranoia about infiltration and treachery.

The Almanac: A Seasonal Guide to 2021 by Lia Leendertz, published by Mitchell Beazley. 

Lost Without You: Loving and Losing Tanya by Vinnie Jones, published by Orion.

‘This is not a love story I ever wanted to tell, because I hoped it would just go on and on, and never end. I thought that we’d grow old together. I never wanted it to be a tale.

But here I am, a middle-aged man sitting at the kitchen table as the California light fades, thinking about the coming night and how to get through it. Trying to explain to someone – to anyone – what it was like to live through something extraordinary: an amazing three decades that happened to me. Three decades that are now over.’

In July 2019 Vinnie Jones tragically lost his wife and soulmate Tanya after her six-year battle with cancer. Tanya and Vinnie had shared 27 amazing years and raised a beautiful family together. Her passing was a devastating shock to everyone – and Vinnie found himself struggling to cope.

In this extraordinarily intimate memoir, Vinnie tackles his grief honestly and with heart, sharing warm and colourful stories from the 25 years he spent married to Tanya, and unfiltered accounts of the reality of grief. From the darkest hours to the happiest moments, and everything in between, it is tender and heart-breaking, deeply honest but also full of humour and hope.

Written to honour Tanya’s life, Lost Without You is a beautiful and brave story of love and loss. Nothing will take away the pain of Tanya’s death, but if in sharing his experiences Vinnie can inspire others in the depths of the unspeakable to find the help they need, then he will have succeeded in the keeping her kind, caring and selfless spirit alive.

Duty of Care: One NHS Doctor’s Story of Courage and Compassion on the Covid-19 Frontline by Dr Dominic Pimenta, published by Welbeck.

Hold on Edna by Aneira Thomas, published by Mirror Books.

The birth of the National Health Service coincided with the birth of one little girl in South Wales: Aneira ‘Nye’ Thomas, the first baby delivered by the NHS.

This is the touching story of Nye’s family – their loves and losses – and the launch of a treasured public service that has touched the lives of every family in the nation.

Above the Clouds: How I Carved My Own Path to the Top of the World by Kilian Jornet, published by Harper Collins.

The Lives of Lucien Freud: Fame 1968-2011 by William Feaver, published by Bloomsbury.

The Story of Scottish Art by Lachlan Goudie, published by Thames & Hudson.

Eat the Buddha by Barbara Demick, published by Granta.

In 1950, China claimed sovereignty over Tibet, leading to decades of unrest and resistance, defining the country today. In Eat the Buddha, Barbara Demick chronicles the Tibetan tragedy from Ngaba, a defiant town on the eastern edge of the Tibetan plateau where dozens of Tibetans have shocked the world since 2009 by immolating themselves.

Following the stories of the last princess of the region, of Tibetans who experienced the struggle sessions of Mao’s Cultural Revolution, of the recent generations of monks and townsfolk experiencing renewed repression, Demick paints a riveting portrait of recent Tibetan history, opening a window onto Tibetan life today, and onto the challenges Tibetans face while locked in a struggle for identity against one of the most powerful countries in the world.

The Story of China: A Portrait of a Civilisation and its People by Michael Wood, published by Simon & Schuster.

My First Little Book of Intersectional Activism by Titiana McGrath, published by Constable.

To Be a Gay Man by Will Young, published by Virgin Books.

In To Be a Gay Man, Will Young speaks out about gay shame, revealing the impact it had on his own life, how he learned to deal with it, and how he can now truthfully say he is gay and happy.

We know Will as a multi-platinum recording artist, Olivier-nominee, and the first winner of the Idol franchise. But his story began long before his first audition. Looking back on a world where growing up being called gay was the ultimate insult and coming out after a lifetime of hiding his sexuality, Will explores the long-lasting impact repressing his true self has had.

As Will’s own story demonstrates, internalised shame in childhood increases the risk of developing low self-worth, and even self-disgust, leading to destructive behaviours in adult life.

Will revisits the darkest extremes he has been to, sharing his vulnerabilities, his regrets, tracing his own navigation through it all and showing the way for others who might have felt alone in the same experience.

Here you will find a friend, champion and mentor, breaking taboos with frank honesty, and offering invaluable practical advice on overcoming the difficult issues too often faced within the LGBTQ+ community.

The Sourdough School: Sweet Baking by Vanessa Kimbell, published by Kyle Books.

British Cheese on Toast by Steve Parker, published by Headline.

A uniquely British phenomenon, there is something magical about cheese on toast. Two simple ingredients that, when put together, are the greatest of comfort foods and the quickest of meals. At its most basic level, this staple of many a British teatime is a delicious pairing, as award-winning cheesemonger Steve Parker shows in this celebration of the nation’s favourite cheeses.

British Cheese on Toast will take you on a tasting tour of British cheeses, showcasing the absolute best along the way. From Cheddar to Wensleydale via soft, blue, smoked and goat’s, in this book you’ll find over 100 recipes plus advice on which cheese to use with which type of bread, as well as suggestions for innovative sweet and savoury flavour combinations to take things to another level.

With a handy guide to shops where artisan cheeses featured in the book can be bought, as well as tips on using supermarket and own-brand cheeses, British Cheese on Toast is a complete celebration of this traditional meal. The perfect gift for cheeselovers everywhere.

The Secret Life of the Savoy by Olivia Williams, published by Headline.

“For The Gondoliers-themed birthday dinner, the hotel obligingly flooded the courtyard to conjure the Grand Canal of Venice. Dinner was served on a silk-lined floating gondola, real swans were swimming in the water, and as a final flourish, a baby elephant borrowed from London Zoo pulled a five-foot high birthday cake.”

In three generations, the D’Oyly Carte family pioneered the luxury hotel and the modern theatre, propelled Gilbert and Sullivan to lasting stardom, made Oscar Wilde a transatlantic celebrity, inspired a P. G. Wodehouse series, and popularised early jazz, electric lights and Art Deco.

Following the history of the iconic Savoy Hotel through three generations of the D’Oyly Carte family, The Secret Life of the Savoy revives an extroardinary cultural legacy.

The Secrets of Tenet: Inside Christopher Nolan’s Quantum Cold War by James Mottram, published by Titan Books.

Fermentation: River Cottage Handbook No. 18 by Rachel de Thample, published by Bloomsbury.

The Good Germans by Catrine Clay, published by Orion.

After 1933, as the brutal terror regime took hold, most of the two-thirds of Germans who had never voted for the Nazis – some 20 million people – tried to keep their heads down and protect their families. They moved to the country, or pretended to support the regime to avoid being denounced by neighbours, and tried to work out what was really happening in the Reich, surrounded as they were by Nazi propaganda and fake news. They lived in fear. Might they lose their jobs? Their homes? Their freedom? What would we have done in their place?

Many ordinary Germans found the courage to resist, in the full knowledge that they could be sentenced to indefinite incarceration, torture or outright execution. Catrine Clay argues that it was a much greater number than was ever formally recorded: teachers, lawyers, factory and dock workers, housewives, shopkeepers, church members, trade unionists, army officers, aristocrats, Social Democrats, Socialists and Communists.

Catrine Clay’s ground-breaking book focuses on six very different characters: Irma, the young daughter of Ernst Thalmann, leader of the German Communists; Fritzi von der Schulenburg, a Prussian aristocrat; Rudolf Ditzen, the already famous author Hans Fallada, best known for his novel Alone in Berlin; Bernt Engelmann, a schoolboy living in the suburbs of Dusseldorf; Julius Leber, a charismatic leader of the Social Democrats in the Reichstag; and Fabian von Schlabrendorff, a law student in Berlin. The six are not seen in isolation but as part of their families: a brother and sister; a wife; a father with three children; an only son; the parents of a Communist pioneer daughter. Each experiences the momentous events of Nazi history as they unfold in their own small lives – Good Germans all.

The Wake Up Call: Why the pandemic has exposed the weakness in the West – and how to fix it by John Micklethwait and Adrian Woolridge, published by Short Books.

Human Journey by Professor Alice Roberts and James Weston Lewis, published by Red Shed.

Food and Climate Change Without the Hot Air: Change Your Diet: The Easiest Way to Save the Planet by S.L. Bridle, published by UIT Cambridge.

Living Better: How I Learned to Survive Depression by Alastair Campbell, published by John Murray.

How to Grow Your Own Poem by Kate Clanchy, published by Picador.

Hey Hi Hello: Five Decades of Pop Culture from Britain’s First Female DJ by Annie Nightingale, published by Orion.

Hey Hi Hello is a greeting we have all become familiar with, as Annie Nightingale cues up another show on Radio One. Always in tune with the nation’s taste, yet effortlessly one step ahead for more than five decades, in this book Annie digs deep into her crate of memories, experiences and encounters to deliver an account of a life lived on the frontiers of pop cultural innovation.

As a dj and broadcaster on radio, tv and the live music scene, Annie has been an invigorating and necessarily disruptive force, working within the establishment but never playing by the rules. She walked in the door at Radio One as a rebel, its first female broadcaster, in 1970. Fifty years later she became the station’s first CBE in the New Year’s Honours List; still a vital force in British music, a dj and tastemaker who commands the respect of artists, listeners and peers across the world.

Hey Hi Hello tells the story of those early, intimidating days at Radio One, the Ground Zero moment of punk and the epiphanies that arrived in the late 80s with the arrival of acid house and the Second Summer of Love. It includes faithfully reproduced and never before seen encounters with Bob Marley, Marc Bolan, The Beatles and bang-up-to-date interviews with Little Simz and Billie Eilish.

Funny, warm and candid to a fault, Annie Nightingale’s memoir is driven by the righteous energy of discovery and passion for music. It is a portrait of an artist without whom the past fifty years of British culture would have looked very different indeed.

The Adulting Manual by Milly Smith and Kate Abey, published by Studio Press.

Burning the Books: A History of Knowledge Under Attack by Richard Ovenden, published by John Murray.

Cassius X: A Legend in the Making by Stuart Cosgrove, published by Polygon.

Black Spartacus: The Epic Life of Toussaint Louverture by Sudhir Hazareesingh, published by Allan Lane.

Chemical Warrior by Hamish de Bretton-Gordon, published by Headline. 

For thirty years, Hamish has served and volunteered in conflict zones around the world. As the army’s foremost chemical weapons expert, he built a unique first-hand understanding of how to prevent attacks and train doctors on the frontline – saving countless lives in the process.

After suffering near-death experiences time and again, Hamish discovered he had a ticking time bomb in his own chest: a heart condition called Sudden Death Syndrome that could kill him at any time. But with a new awareness for the fragility of life, he fought harder to make his count.

Despite facing extraordinary personal danger, Hamish has unearthed evidence of multiple chemical attacks in Syria and continues to advise the government at the highest level, including after the 2018 Novichok poisoning in Salisbury. Lifting the lid on Hamish’s unique world of battlefield expertise and humanitarian work, Chemical Warrior is a thrilling story of bravery and compassion.

The Gran Tour: Travel with my Elders by Ben Aitken, published by Icon Books.

The Artisan Kitchen: The Science, Practice and Possibilities by James Strawbridge, published by DK.

Give: Charity and the Art of Giving Generously by Magnus McFarlane-Barrow, published by William Collins.

The Power of Rude: A Woman’s Guide to Asserting Herself by Rebecca Reid, published by Orion.

The Power of Rude will discuss the way women are constantly worrying about being polite, even finding themselves in uncomfortable situations they’d rather avoid due to a fear of saying the wrong thing. For example, we’ll learn about the woman who paid for an entire hen do that she wasn’t even invited on (because she didn’t want to be rude!), the woman who let her cousin practice kissing on her (because she didn’t want to be rude!) and the vegan woman who ate an entire pork chop (because she didn’t want to be rude!).

This empowering call-to-arms will journey through dating, family relationships, sex, the workplace, money, customer service, and more and show women how we can reclaim the word ‘rude’ and use it to advantage.

For decades, women have been called ‘bossy’, ‘hysterical’ and ‘neurotic’ in situations where men might simply be dubbed ‘assertive’. We need to change the narrative around women and we need to use our voices to take control. Rebecca Reid isn’t afraid to show us how.

A Belfast Child: My True Story of Life and Death in the Troubles by John Chambers, published by John Blake.

Treasure Islands: True Tales of a Shipwreck Hunter by Alec Crawford, published by Berlinn Ltd.

In 1971 Alec Crawford is determined to make his fortune from ship salvage. Early attempts lead nowhere until he teams up with a new partner, Simon Martin. Diving in Hebridean waters, they explore remains of the Spanish Armada, and the wreck of the SS Politician, the vessel made famous in Whisky Galore. But money is scarce and irregular, and the work is fraught with danger and disappointment.

Until they hear of one of the most incredible wrecks of all time – the White Star Liner Oceanic, which, when built in 1899, was the biggest and most luxurious ship in the world. Widely regarded as an ‘undiveable’ wreck, lying somewhere off the remote island of Foula, they decide to take the challenge. If successful, the rewards will be enormous, but unbelievably dangerous waters and appalling weather conditions are just half the challenge. When a large salvage company takes action against them, they also have a huge legal fight on their hands.

Ramble Book: Musings on Childhood, Friendship, Family and 80s Pop Culture by Adam Buxton, published by Harper Collins.

Ramble

/ˈramb(ə)l/

Verb

1. walk for pleasure in the countryside.

‘Dr Buckles and Rosie the dog love rambling in the countryside.’

2. talk or write at length in a confused or inconsequential way.

‘Adam rambles on about lots of consequential, compelling and personal matters in his tender, insightful, hilarious and totally unconfused memoir, Ramble Book.’

Ramble Book is about parenthood, boarding school trauma, arguing with your partner, bad parties, confrontations on trains, friendship, wanting to fit in, growing up in the 80s, dead dads, teenage sexual anxiety, failed artistic endeavours, being a David Bowie fan; and how everything you read, watch and listen to as a child forms a part of the adult you become. 

It’s also a book about the joys of going off topic and letting your mind wander.

And it’s about a short, hairy, frequently confused man called Adam Buxton.

Sh*ged, Married, Annoyed by Chris & Rosie Ramsey, published by Michael Joseph.

Awakenings in the Time of Coronvirus by Sophie Sabbage, published by Coronet.

The most serious health crisis in a century has delivered a tsunami of unexpected, stressful events – lifeshocks – to most of the world. It has also shone a light on long-standing mental challenges we have not done enough to remedy:

– The pre-existing epidemic of loneliness, which research shows has been killing more people that diabetes, cancer and heart disease;

– An inability to handle fear in the face of uncertainty and adversity;

– A steady rise in numerous mental health issues in every age group.

This potent audiobook provides profound insights into these issues and practical ways to engage with them. Sophie teaches these by talking to real people about their lifeshocks and guiding them through the processes as well as by sharing her insights and experiences. It is a mini-workshop in a book, authored by someone who has been living with terminal cancer since 2014 and who has equipped thousands of people to find emotional freedom.

Honey, I Home-schooled the Kids by Nadia Sawalha and Mark Adderley, published by Coronet.

A personal and practical guide to homeschooling by Loose Women’s Nadia Sawalha and her husband Mark Adderley.

TV presenter Nadia and her husband Mark took their two children out of mainstream school five years ago. Since then they have homeschooled them. At a time when so many of us are being forced to rethink our roles as parents and teachers, Mark and Nadia bring their experiences – the good and the bad – and offer a candid and practical guide to teaching at home.

Statistics show that the number of homeschooled children in the UK has increased by 40% over the last three years, and the rate is steadily increasing. With humour and frankness Nadia and Mark share the challenges and rewards of their home school experiences, and ask what ‘success’ really means when it comes to our children’s education.

Bringing their energy, enthusiasm and openness to what is becoming an ever more relevant aspect of our lives, Honey, I Home Schooled the Kids will share obstacles, insights and resources that all parents can learn from, whether they’re looking for help supporting their child at school or if they have decided to take the plunge and home school.

This book is an honest and no holds barred guide for anyone interested in embarking on the homeschooling journey.

Jurgen Klopp – Notes on a Season – Liverpool FC by Jurgen Klopp, published by Reach Sport.

Line of Duty – The Real Story of British Police Corruption by Wensley Clarkson, published by John Blake.

Women in the Kitchen: Twelve Essential Cookbook Writers Who Defined the Way We Eat from 1661 to Today by Anne Willan, published by Scribner.

How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint of Everything by Mike Berners-Lee, published by Profile Books.

Work: A History of How We Spend Our Time by James Suzman, published by Bloomsbury.

Twisted: A Cookbook by Twisted, published by Hodder & Stoughton.

Tom Jackson and Harry Bamber created Twisted back in 2016 with one thing in mind; to remind people that cooking should be outrageous fun. Through their unstoppable, engaging recipe videos, their refreshing take on food and cooking was brought to life, and has since been adopted by millions all over the world, becoming a global phenomenon in just 3 years. Having created thousands of indulgent, innovative, mouth-watering dishes with clever, simple twists, Twisted: A Cookbook is it’s most eye-wateringly brilliant collection of 100+ new recipes to date. Prepare for mealtimes to look a little different from now on.

So that’s that. Time to catch a breath and make some in-roads into the TBR because before we know it, Super Thursday will be upon us and another raft of great books will be there for the buying.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.