A Mrs Miracle Christmas by Debbie Macomber – extract

Debbie Macomber is the best selling author of over 100 novels and sold over 60 million copies. Her latest novel,  A Mrs Miracle Christmas, is published by Arrow on 14 November 2019.

Arrow have kindly allowed me to share an extract from A Mrs Miracle Christmas with you.

The following day, Laurel placed a call to the first agency on her list to see about hiring a home companion to stay with her grandmother while she and Zach were at their respective jobs.

“I wish I had someone,” the woman from Caring Angels said, introducing herself as Elise Jones. “Unfortunately, every one of the caretakers in our agency is already out on assignment.”

“Oh dear.” This wasn’t the news that Laurel wanted to hear.

“I’d be happy to put your name on a waiting list.” Laurel was already sadly familiar with waiting lists. The idea of being placed on another made her cringe.

“Do you have any idea how long it will take before you have someone available?”

The woman hesitated. Laurel could hear the clicking of her computer keys in the background. She didn’t know how much longer she could wait. The situation with her grandmother was quickly becoming critical. “I can’t see anything opening up before the first of the year.”

“That long?” Another month, Laurel thought to herself. All she could do was hope that someone would become available sooner, rather than later. The one bright spot was that with Christmas nearly upon them, she’d be home from school for a couple weeks around the holidays. Thankfully, she wouldn’t need to return until after the first of the year.

“Should I put your name on the list?”

Seeing that she had no other option, Laurel agreed. “Please.”

After giving the agency all the pertinent information, Laurel hung up the phone and called two other agencies. They had longer waiting lists than the Caring Angels agency. She phoned Zach to give him the news.

“What did you find out?” he asked.

“We’re on a waiting list. They expect to have someone available after the first of the year.”

Zach didn’t hide his concern. “Do you think she’ll be all right by herself until your Christmas break?”

“Do we have a choice?”

“I guess not,” Zach said, sounding as defeated as Laurel felt.

Zach returned home a little more than an hour and a half later, and together, the three sat down for dinner. Just as Laurel was about to take her last bite from her meal, the doorbell chimed. Zach looked at Laurel and she at him.

She shrugged in response. “I’m not expecting anyone.

Are you?”

“Nope. I’ll get it.” Zach slid back his chair and headed to the front door.

Laurel watched from the kitchen. An older woman stood on the other side of the threshold. She was dressed in a full- length wool coat with a thick scarf wrapped around her neck. She carried a basket on her arm and had a wide smile on her face.

“Good evening,” she greeted cheerfully. “I’m Mrs. Miracle.”

“Mrs. Miracle,” Zach repeated, sounding puzzled.

“How may I help you?”

“I believe I’m here to help you. I understand you put in a request for a Caring Angel.”

About the book

Laurel McCullough is in desperate need of help.

Her beloved grandmother has just been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and the baby she and her husband Zach have longed for now seems like an impossible dream.

So when Mrs Miracle appears at the door, Laurel couldn’t be more relieved. She invites the nurse into her life and it’s not long before they become firm friends.

When her grandmother’s condition begins to improve, and as Laurel and Zach continue their desperate quest for a child, Laurel soon realises that there is more to Mrs Miracle than meets the eye…

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